Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
May 9, 2012
Image Size
2.3 MB
Resolution
1627×1310
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
22,483 (6 today)
Favourites
1,316 (who?)
Comments
72
Downloads
1,113 (2 today)
×
One Point Perspective Checkered floor by WillWorks One Point Perspective Checkered floor by WillWorks
I got another on ready for you all.

What I am demonstrating on this work is how to draw a checker board patter with linear perspective. This technique use the same bisector technique from the last work submitted. One new feature is the diagonal bisector lines are now moving back to the vanishing points.

It is simple all you need is to make two bisecting diagonal lines and draw them out to the horizon. Were the lines meat the horizon is were you will place a new vanishing point. This new vanishing point is known as dvp (diagonal vanishing point). Then you draw one line retreating to the vp (vanishing point) and another moving across horizontal though the midpoint.

When this is done you can make another diagonal bisecting lines. To make sure they are accurate see if the new diagonal lines meets at the dvps. You can do this over and over. You can use this for making pattern like the checker patter I showed you. Or you can also use this for placing images on that surface using a grid technique.

Bisectors: are lines that spit the area in half.

Diagonal Vanishing Point also known as DVP, is the reference points where all parallel diagonal vanishing lines meet. The diagonal line are often guidelines.

Diagonal Bisectors: are lines spanning from opposite corners, splitting the area in half diagonally.

Guidelines: Lines that give reference in the direction, but will not be in the final rendering of the work as lines or implied lines.

Horizon: Line that separates the sky from the plain, mostly the earth.

Horizon Bisectors: Are Horizontal Lines that split the area Horizontally.

Lines: Marks spanning from one point to another setting boundaries for shapes and forms.

Linear Perspective: A geometric rendering for illustration where all parallel line meat at the point of infinity. Helping the artist render an accurate foreshortening of the subject.

Midpoint: the point were the Diagonal Bisectors meet locating the center of the area.

Negative Space: Space not filled in by the subject and the opposite of Positive Space.

One Point Perspective: a form linear perspective using only one vanishing point.

Positive Space: Space filled in by the subject and the opposite of Negative Space.

Vanishing Guidelines: Guidelines that give reference to Vanishing Lines.

Vanishing Lines: Parallel lines heading to the vanishing point.

Vanishing Point: also known as VP, is the reference points where all parallel vanishing lines meet.

Vertical Bisectors: Vertical line that splits the area vertically.

Previous work



Please give me credit if you display this diagram on any medium.
Add a Comment:
 

Daily Deviation

Given 2012-05-23
One Point Perspective Checkered floor by *FireWater12Is one of several excellent tutorials by this deviant for all artists who are learning about perspective ( Featured by Elandria )
:iconepexis:
This is actually quite the informative piece of work!

When I was younger, I had two very bad points in my artwork. Proportion and perspective. Thought I worked on proportions enough to actually get a bit of a hand on it, perspectives were something that seemed too hard to do, and no matter what I did I could never get it right. This helpful piece of work is something I wish I had sooner! It's a wonderful and clear-cut example on how to do perspectives properly in a simple and very often used point of view. If I had to say anything bad about this, it's that the checkered tile board is a little crooked, and that might throw quite a few people off. The right side sticks out a tad bit more than the left.. :x

Other than that, I'm glad to see some diversity in the DD artworks, and I'm glad something as helpful as this hits the spotlight every one ina while. Very nice job.
What do you think?
The Artist thought this was FAIR
17 out of 17 deviants thought this was fair.

The Artist has requested Critique on this Artwork

Please sign up or login to post a critique.

:iconinnocent-rebel:
innocent-rebel Featured By Owner May 10, 2013  Student General Artist
These charts are amazingly helpful. Thank you so much.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 13, 2013   General Artist
Thanks :)
Reply
:iconfireyuuki:
FireYuuki Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Love this!
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2012   General Artist
Thanks

I also improved it so it can be of more help ;)

[link]
Reply
:iconshadegirl0412:
shadegirl0412 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2012  Student General Artist
oh my glob, I can't believe I found this! We're doing 1 point perspective in school, so this would be a great help :) thank you!!
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2012   General Artist
I am glad you found it helpful :)
Reply
:iconsongofafreeheart:
songofafreeheart Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2012
The question that tortures me: How do you determine where the vanishing point is?
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012   General Artist
Vanishing point is the reference points where all parallel vanishing lines meet. If you are drawing something new you can use the point as a guideline. If there are two line that are parallel then they should meet a the vanishing point. It also work the other way around. If you have a photo with parallel lines you can use them to find the point. It would be wh ere they meet.

In many ways you can have the vanishing point any were on the paper. Some will put it in the middle but other artist want to make their works more dynamic buy not placing it dead center. Yet if you place it about a fourth the way out of drawing you may need to use two point perspective or it will look off. The dvp (mp) should be the same distance apart if the object is a square.

I hope I answered your question. :) If I did not I may draw up something to help. ;)
Reply
:iconsongofafreeheart:
songofafreeheart Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012
I still don't quite get it. I mean, in this picture for example, how did you decide where the two outer points went so it would look right?
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012   General Artist
When you are talking about outer points are you talking about the dvp points at the horizon or the corners of the checker board?
Reply
:iconsongofafreeheart:
songofafreeheart Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012
the dvp.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2012   General Artist
Ok, so lets try this.

You have bisector lines. To make it a bisector line you draw a line from one corner to the opposite corner and when you do it again on the other two corners you make a figure X.

If the pattern on liner perspective is composed of rectangles of the same dimension then the figure X of bisectors should be consistent. (think over view not linear on this)

If the figure X of bisectors are consistent then the bisecting lines should be parallel. (think over view not linear on this)

If the lines are parallel and it is leaner perspective then they should meet at the same vanishing point.

Now there is one point perspective and two point perspective. Lets say we have them one over the another. One perspective point would be 0˚. And the one Two point perspective on the right is 45˚ and the other on the left is -45˚. Now the two lines come down and meet they should be bisected by the line coming down from the one point perspective point. Just as the one point perspective can be bisected by both and in a way the two do play as the dvp. Now if it was a square it should be even on both side. A rectangle that is not a square would be have on bisector at a < 45˚(greater than 45˚) and another > 45˚ (less then 45˚). This would mean that a the say 30˚ would be retreating away at a shorter distance than the 60˚ from the point of origin. But if they are both 45˚ then they should be retreating away form the point of origin at the same distance. At the end, if the object is a square then you should have the same distance in the two point perspective (dvp)s from the one point perspective.

One thing that also helps is the draw a circle and the radial point is the one Perspective point. And to set up bisectors to make squares you draw a line though the middle of the circle and the two points are the bisectors vanishing points (dvp). This would mean they are the same distance. Also with the circle you can have this cone vision (I plan on getting to that latter) that helps you have the right angle of sight. Without cone vision it is easier to have a distorted views were say a square, although accurate, is elongated and hard to look at.

I hope this helped :) Yet This may be getting very geometric and mathematical :faint: and I may need to make a visual aid.
Reply
:iconsongofafreeheart:
songofafreeheart Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2012
I'm sorry - but I think I need visual aid. This all just reads like a jumble to me. It's not that you didn't do a good job - it's that math doesn't make much sense to me. I work in images.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012   General Artist
I will see what I can come up with for visuals. Bare with me it may take some time as I have some other things coming up soon. This is a demanding month. :)

I will let you know when I get it made :)
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconbluerosefantasy:
bluerosefantasy Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2012  Student Artist
Thank you for this! :D
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012   General Artist
Your welcome, I am pleased you appreciate it :)
Reply
:iconclumsydemonwithfire:
clumsydemonwithfire Featured By Owner May 25, 2012   General Artist
this is really helpful! thank you for sharing!
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 25, 2012   General Artist
Your welcome I am glad it helped :)
Reply
:iconkessir:
kessir Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Um If i may ask this since i'm not quite sure if I understood from the description:
This is for using when you draw with vanishing points and want to add areas that all appear to have the same length within an are even in perspective, right?

Thanks so much for this, if it is, I've been trying to understand how horizontal lines add up on a plane vanishing point drawing :) Until now i've only made them freehand all the time :(
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 27, 2012   General Artist
I am working on a tutorial right now that is on grid drawing. When I finished 'checkered floor' I realized there may need to make the up a tutorial that can help explain what I am talking about.

But I will see if I can clarify this better. Say you have an image and you want to blow it up without a computer. What you do is make a grid, a series of rows and columns. You make a grid on the small image and then you make an identical grid on the black surface. And then you can use all the vertical and horizontal lines as guide lines to help get the proportions right. Now you can make this grid again but say the lines setting up boundaries for the rows and columns are distorted the image will look more distorted. In a way the checkered floor you can use that rule and apply making the image you want look like a painting from an other angle as the image of the grid is from an angle rather than straight on.

I hope this helped. But if it did not then I am working on a new tutorial and that may illustrate what I am trying to talk about.
Reply
:iconkessir:
kessir Featured By Owner May 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Ooooh I see now :) Thanks alot for taking the time to explain it so explicitly for me again. Sorry to be a bother, I get the point of this way of construction now :)
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 28, 2012   General Artist
Your welcome :)
Reply
:iconshiroujune:
ShirouJune Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks a lot :D! I'll practice hard with this ^^
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Glad you found it helpful. :)
Reply
:iconkorhann:
Korhann Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Student General Artist
Very good that explanation o.o
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Thanks :)
Reply
:iconasjjohnson:
AsjJohnson Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm actually more interested in how you did this than in what it says. ^_^" I've seen this stuff about perspective before (although I only recently saw stuff about those bisector vanishing points, and keep forgetting to use them when applicable. :/ ) But anyhow, I think it's a neat way of making a tutorial.
hmm... I just realized, this could very easily be 2-point perspective, with one bisector vanishing point.
...this is totally off topic, but have you ever seen 1-point perspective, but also with a high or low vanishing point? So it's like a 1-point 3-point perspective? Like a skyscrapper viewed head on. I've done that a few times without really thinking about it, and I think I've realized it doesn't quite work unless there's a vertical horizon(?) line connecting the two points. But I haven't heard anything about it, so what I've found is just based on what I've seen from doing it myself.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 27, 2012   General Artist
In some ways this is two point perspective. You can say that the checker board floor is a transition from the one point to two point. At the end anything relating to logic, geometry and mathematics with their complex formulas are just different compositions of their field simpler principles. What I want to do is start off more simple and then work up to more complex formulas artist can use. I plan on getting to the two point perspective then three, curvilinear and even more.

And on the other question, yes I seen work like that. You can have vertical horizon line you can even have diagonal horizons as some Sci-fi artist demonstrate. In the true world the horizon is actually the horizon if the plane gone to infinity. If you want to be really accurate the horizon is below the infinite horizon, as the plane we are on is round and curves downwards. You can use a vertical horizon as a guideline. It can help you determine were one vanishing point relates to the other. This is getting a little ahead but when it come to horizons it may not hurt to drop them down a little. I will get to that in more detail later. Not only is it more accurate but it also helps make the background more engaging. At the end even the horizon horizontal is a guideline.
Reply
:iconhyperchronic:
HyperChronic Featured By Owner May 23, 2012
Fantastic job! This will be so helpful for me in the future. :aww:
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Glad it will help you out in the future. :)
Reply
:iconxipezele:
xipezele Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for this...My drawing professor wanted me to like...take my ruler and measure each individual little mark and have it all squared and measured twice...this guide works a lot better XD.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Thanks.

I am glad this is very helpful. I am planing on producing more of these ;)
Reply
:iconrufusmador:
RufusMador Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Professional Artist
it's so nerdy that I love this.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 27, 2012   General Artist
Thanks :)
Reply
:iconneoconvoy:
Neoconvoy Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Student General Artist
Thanks!
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Your welcome :)

Glad you found it useful.
Reply
:iconnignag:
NigNag Featured By Owner May 23, 2012
I like this
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Thanks :)
Reply
:iconstudley13:
Studley13 Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist Interface Designer
Reminds me of my technical drawing.
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 27, 2012   General Artist
How?
Reply
:iconstudley13:
Studley13 Featured By Owner May 28, 2012  Hobbyist Interface Designer
I did technical drawing for 2 years (years 9 & 10) of high school and we spent a good deal of that time doing mechanical perspective drawing, in both two and three point, drawing things as simple as blocks to detailed houses.
Reply
:iconweida34:
weida34 Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist
very useful! thanks for making this :)
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Your welcome I am glad you found it useful :)
Reply
:iconohnhai:
Ohnhai Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
good stuff
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Thanks :)
Reply
:iconjwg23:
JWG23 Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
great tutorial and congrats
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Thanks :)
Reply
:iconjwg23:
JWG23 Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks 4 Thanks
Reply
:iconlemures87:
Lemures87 Featured By Owner May 23, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
so simple, so nice, I'm into these stuff from a year!
Reply
:iconwillworks:
WillWorks Featured By Owner May 24, 2012   General Artist
Thank :)
Reply
Add a Comment: